Faculty Summaries
Yu-Ning Wong, MD, MSCE
Yu-Ning Wong, MD, MSCE
Assistant Professor
  • Societal and Clinical Implications of Cost Sharing for Cancer Treatments

    The RAND Health Insurance Experiment and follow up studies of prescription drug utilization have found that patients may be “price sensitive” and use fewer services when they are responsible for a larger proportion of treatment related costs.  However the impact of cost sharing on choice of new, but costly cancer medications is uncertain.   In this study, we are measuring cancer patients’ willingness to pay for hypothetical  treatments in the adjuvant and palliative setting. , We are using conjoint analysis to understand how patients make tradeoffs among treatments of varying efficacy, toxicity and cost.  We will examine the impact of demographic factors, including age, race, and socioeconomic status on the patients choice of treatment.  This study is funded by the  American Society of Clinical Oncology Career Development Award and National Cancer Institute Grant # 1K07CA136995-01

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  • Preparatory Aid to Improve Decision Making about Cancer Clinical Trials

    The primary objective of the proposed research is to improve preparation for consideration of clinical trials by providing tailored information to address barriers related to knowledge, goals and values, and beliefs and expectancies before their physician visit. Previous studies of the decision making process for cancer patients considering clinical trials have focused on patient assessment after the oncologist consultation has taken place.  We postulate that the optimal time to overcome patient psychosocial barriers is before the initial physician consultation. The study evaluates the role of a receive tailored video education tool that address clinical trials barriers.   By preparing cancer patients for discussion about clinical trials, we hypothesize that they will be better able to weigh risks and benefits of each treatment option, deal with uncertainty regarding outcomes, and arrive at a treatment decision most consonant with their preferences. We anticipate that improving decision making in this context will translate into increased patient participation in clinical trials. This study is conducted in collaboration with Case Comprehensive Cancer Center and Karmonos Cancer Center. The study is funded by  National Institutes of Health Grant, R01 CA127655.

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