Infusion Room Treatment



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Fox Chase Cancer Center Information

Patient Information Documents

Download these PDF files for answers to Frequently Asked Questions on Chemotherapy topics

White Blood Cells and Infections

Red Blood Cells and Anemia

Platelet Precautions

Cancer-Related Fatigue

Chemotherapy Safety in the Home

How to manage possible side effect of chemotherapy

Patient and Family Support

Find the help you need beyond medical treatment.
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Returning Patients

All you need to know before returning to Fox Chase
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What you need to know about your Infusion Room treatment

The infusion Room provides infusion services 
for established Fox Chase patients requiring 
chemotherapy, 
hydration, 
blood product transfusions, 
and non-chemotherapy transfusions.

You may get your chemotherapy as an outpatient in the Infusion Room of our Outpatient Department, during a Hospital stay or at home. The decision about where you receive your chemotherapy depends on which drug or drugs you are getting.

Infusion Room Hours

7 am - 7:30 pm, 
Monday-Friday

Who should I call if I have any questions about my treatment?

Call the Patient Call Center to speak with a nurse who will help you.

Day
215-728-4300
Night (after 5pm), Weekends, and Holidays
215-728-6900

How long will my treatment take?

Your nurse will let you know how long your treatment will be as it is different for everyone. We try hard to keep you close to your appointment time, but you may have to wait. Some times are less busy than others in the infusion room. Ask your scheduler if a less busy time is available for you. It is best not to make appointments outside of Fox Chase on the same day as your treatment.

Can I have someone with me during my treatment?

Yes, you may have 1 person with you in the room during your treatment. Others are welcome to sit in the waiting room. Children under 12 are not allowed in the infusion room.

What should I wear the day of my  treatment?

Wear comfortable clothes. Dress in layers to adjust to changes in the temperature as needed.

Infusion room

What can I do to help pass the time?

There is a TV in the room for you to watch regular programs, educational videos, and a relaxation channel. You can bring something to read, a tablet, or MP3 player. There is free Wi-Fi in the room.

What about food?

We have coffee, tea, juice, ginger ale and crackers for you to eat. You can bring in food and drinks from home or you can buy them from the Terrace Cafe or the cafeteria.

Should I take my regular medicines before my treatment?

Yes, take your regular medicines on the day of your treatment, unless your doctor or nurse tells you not to.   Bring your  medicines with you to your  treatment.

Preparing for Chemotherapy
Preparing for Chemotherapy (Part 1)
(24 min.)
Fox Chase offers a free video for patients, called “Preparing for Chemotherapy.”

In this one-hour presentation, you will learn from a Fox Chase nurse and social worker what to expect from your treatment and how to manage possible side effects.
If you are about to begin chemotherapy, we strongly recommend this video. 
(Part 2 is below.)

Preparing for Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is the use of drugs for treating cancer. 

Chemotherapy varies, depending on the type of cancer you have and the drug(s) you receive. You may get treatment in one or more of the following ways:

  • Orally (pill or liquid form)
  • Topically (applied to the skin)
  • Intramuscularly (injected into a muscle)
  • Subcutaneously (injected under the skin)
  • Intravenously (injected into a vein)

Chemotherapy by mouth, on the skin or by injection feels the same as taking other medications by these methods. Intravenous chemotherapy feels like having blood drawn for a lab test, but the needle stays in place longer.

Chemotherapy also may be delivered to specific areas within the body by a tube called a catheter. The catheter can be placed into the spine, abdomen, bladder or liver.

You may get your chemotherapy as an outpatient in the Infusion Room of our Outpatient Department, during a Hospital stay or at home. The decision about where you receive your chemotherapy depends on which drug or drugs you are getting.

Before your treatment begins, your doctor and nurse will explain the chemotherapy procedure to you.

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